What Do You Want From A Network File System?

We’ve been using OpenAFS as the School’s network file system (i.e. the thing that lets you access your DICE home directory and research group space on pretty much any machine from pretty much anywhere in the world) for the best part of 15 years. That’s a awfully long time in the fast moving world of computing and so one of the development projects I have on my plate at the moment is to look into whether OpenAFS is still the most appropriate fit to the School’s needs.

From my ivory tower, I can draw up a long list of filesystem features and capabilities which I think might be desirable but at the end of the day, what’s useful and what’s unnecessary can only be determined by you, the end user.

So please take a few moments to let me know what you think about the existing School network filesystem. Tell me about what you like about it, what you dislike about it and missing features you would like to see in a replacement. There’s no guarantee that any requests can be met but at least they can be taken into account. You can make your opinions heard by leaving a comment after this article or emailing me at

cms @ inf.ed.ac.uk

Remember, it’s the School’s network file system I’m interested in, your DICE home directory and research group space stored on the School’s file servers and accessed via a pathname beginning /afs/inf.ed.ac.uk/…. I’m not concerned at the moment with any centrally provided file space or data stored on self-managed machines.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Craig.

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2 Responses to What Do You Want From A Network File System?

  1. bundy says:

    I know I’m a dinosaur, but I’m quite happy with AFS. It meets my needs. It took me time and effort to set it up on my (too) many machines, so I don’t want to invest that effort again unless there is a real gain in functionality that I would find useful. Because “15 years ..[is an].. awfully long time in the fast moving world of computing” is not a good enough reason in itself.

  2. idurkacz says:

    ‘Age’ of the system is not the problem per se; however a fundamental problem is what seems to be diminishing active support for the OpenAFS project.

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